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From the Winter 2016 Issue

The Biggest of the Smallest
On September 17 Museum member Bernd Schumacher displayed some of his Z scale equipment (1/220th full size, below), aiming for his collection to be recognized by the Guinness organization as the world’s largest. He began collecting in 1992 and focuses on European items.

A Good Year
Someone connected with the Pacific Coast Railway carefully saved many newspaper clippings concerning our local narrow-gauge line. The smaller articles were stapled to standard size sheets of paper, and most have dates hand written next to them. Unfortunately, the article quoted here did not identify the newspaper. It was probably the Santa Maria Times. This one is dated July 13, 1938, and is in a column headed “Fifty Years Ago,” so it’s originally from the year 1888. “The annual report of the Pacific Coast railroad was filed yesterday. The total cost of construction was $2,072,233, of equipment $204,795. …total income from all sources [was] $193,003, in comparison with [operating] expenditures of $82,989. The line is in operation between Port Harford and Los Olivos, a distance of 79 miles..."
And more...

Structural and civil engineers should enjoy this one.
Also people who have been in the military. And people who have been in any organization with a hierarchy. But everyone has to be patient while we get some background out of the way. The American Civil War (1861-65) was the first conflict to engage railroads in a significant role. They carried troops and supplies with unprecedented speed, and fed the industries at the dawn of warfare that used standardized parts. Some rail cars were even made to carry canons and mortars. For an amusing depiction of a Civil War era rail-mounted mortar, it’s hard to beat a scene in Buster Keaton’s 1926 film “The General.”
And more...

And much more...

Newsletter Archives

Glen Matteson, Newsletter Editor
Email: newsletter@slorrm.com

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Issue 58 - Winter 2016
Issue 57 - Fall 2016
Issue 56 - Summer 2016
Issue 55 - Spring 2016
Issue 54 - Winter 2015
Issue 53 - Summer 2015
Issue 52 - Spring 2015
Issue 51 - Winter 2014-2015
Issue 50 - Summer 2014
Issue 49 - Fall 2013
Issue 48 - Summer 2013
Issue 47 - Spring 2013
Issue 46 - Winter 2013
Vol. 13, No. 3 - Summer/Fall 2012
Vol. 13, No. 2 - Spring/Summer 2012
Vol. 13, No. 1 - Winter 2012
Vol. 12, No. 4 - Fall 2011
Vol. 12, No. 3 - Summer 2011
Vol. 12, No. 2 - Spring 2011
Vol. 12, No. 1 - Winter 2011
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Vol. 11, No. 1 - Winter 2010
Vol. 10, No. 3 - Fall 2009
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Vol. 1, No. 4A - Spring 1999
Vol. 1, No. 4 - June 1998
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Vol. 1, No. 1 - March 1998